Digital Printing – the next big thing in sustainable fashion

Digital Printing – the next big thing in sustainable fashion

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Sustainable fashion is the new normcore in fashion industry. With a slew of fashion designers veering towards sustainability, an inevitable question arises – what makes a fashion label sustainable?

From crop production to ginning to yarn making to dyeing to garment construction to supply logistics to final sales at retail counter, multiple issues plague the fashion industry. However, the number one environmental risk factor in garment production is water pollution. Hazards of water effluents are not unknown. The amount of water currently used, wasted, and polluted is staggering.

The fashion industry is shifting towards digital printing to reduce its environmental impact. It is the future of sustainable fashion. Digital printing is an environmental friendly, cost-effective and higher quality option for apparel and textile printing needs. Studies have shown that there is an average reduction of 60% water consumption, 55% energy consumption and 95% CO2 emissions.

At “YOU-NIQUE”, a recent fashion show held by Solunaris Color Expert Solutions at Y.M.C.A Ahmedabad, digital printing on the textiles was highlighted as a sustainable future path to conform to the environment cause. Seven city-based designers came together to create 70 exquisite designs as part of the collection. The show was curated by Meeta Manglani and Niraj Shah. Designers invited to participate included Digvijay Singh, Dipali Shah, Mehal Desai, Swati Chopra and Ujjval Shah. Top Indian models, skillfully choreographed by Utsav Dholakia, scorched the ramp in exquisite wear digitally printed in chanderi, soft silk, smooth satin, handloom, khadi and chiffon.

Here’s the preview of the show for those who missed out on it:

Meeta Manglani & Moh: Double Nine

The curator of the show, Meeta Manglani, presented her Double Nine Collection that brought versatile options for work wear to evening wear. Models traipsed in sheer flared pants, flowy skirts and cropped pants teamed with multi slit cover-ups besides the staple long dresses. Horizontal stripes and abstract designs in the hues of grey and black complemented the colour palette of peach,red, grey, black and yellow. Silk, satin and crepe fabrics went well with the digital printing theme. It was indeed wearable collection that transported one from staid work space to an evening soiree.

Mehal Desai: Shaila

Mehal Desai’s Shaila had her women walking in geometrical printed silhouettes, asymmetric tunics with cropped pants, front tie dress and angarakha dresses. Models turned up bare feet wearing big bindis on forehead and portrayed the image of a modern and fearless femme. The colour palette boasted of earthy shades like mustard yellow, ivory, rust and black. Vermilion sprinkled over the classic pitambari fabric was the imagery to fall for. Geometric blocks and mandala designs kept the label different from the rest.

Swati Chopra: Butachaap

A graphic and fashion designer from Symbiosis, Swati Chopra’s Butachaap was a collection of fresh peppy colours like neon green, yellow, pink and peach. It reminded one that the spring had just arrived and a rose sherbet in hand would be apt. While her design translation on western wear was beautiful in form of long white dress and skirts and tops, the ethnic wear created a design déjà vu where one could think of Global Desi and Biba prints.

N.ido by Niraj Shah: Sky Lounge

An alumni of CEPT and IIM Kolkatta, Niraj Shah was credited for conceptualising the show. Making his debut, the designer portrayed his thought maze of wide skies, clouds, towering sculptures and airport ambiences on his garments – cover-ups.

His creations included bold ensembles of navel baring crop top and skinny bottoms, hot pants, drapey dhoti bottoms – all paired with long cover-ups in chanderi and sporty shoes. Designed to create a relaxed airport look, his garments had four pockets, abstract prints, and architectural photographs in blush blue, white and black shades.

Ujjwal Shah, Noya: Panchtatva

Known for her sustainable practices in the textile industry, Ujjwal Shah stole the show with her Panchtatva collection. As the name suggests, the product repertoire was based on the five main elements of the nature: Fire, Water, Air, Earth and Sky.

The audience enjoyed watching the models flaunting the summery mood in digital printed garments that consisted of designs like birds, reindeers and night sky in various shades. With green, mustard, brown, aqua blue, pink and purple dominating the colour palette, the clothes at times seemed like a scene out of Van Gogh painting.  Sphagetti maxi dresses, one shoulder silhouettes, slip dresses made for perfect holiday wear this season. The delicate headdresses added to the charm.

Dipali Shah – Marrakesh collection

Dipali Shah, who is popular for vivid styles of gowns, experimented with georgette, velvet and crepe fabrics prominently for her collection at “YOU-NIQUE”. Her outfits were inspired by Marrakech culture – colourful headgears and kaftans made the mainstay of her show. Flowy dresses, jumpsuits in emerald green, blush blue, yellow, peach and lilac drew everyone’s attention. With subtle embroidery, she also added flouncy sleeves, stripes, ruffles and fringes to the detailing of the garment. Blush blue long kaftan dress with mustard flowers was one of her best designs.

Digvijay Singh: Bbg Royal

Spectators were in for a delight when Digvijay Singh revived the classy retro era with his chiffon sarees styled with sleeveless bow-back blouses. Fresh pastel shades like peach, pistachio green, aqua blue and red was like a sight for the sore eyes. The look was accentuated with oversized sunglasses, vintage pearls and classy scarves. One could feel as if you had been transported to the times when life was slow and fun, where music, good dressing and good food were the way of life. With 1960s song playing in the background, the show concluded with elan. Needless to say, Old is Gold.

From polka dots, sunflowers, stripes, birds and animals, designers brought everything to life with their digital printed creations. Showcased on pure natural fabrics, the show successfully made fashion connoisseurs believe that digital printing will definitely be the next big thing in the industry.

From L-R (Meeta Manglani, Digvijay Singh, Swati Chopra, Niraj Shah, Dipali Shah, Mehal Desai and Ujjwal Shah)

4 Replies to “Digital Printing – the next big thing in sustainable fashion”

    1. Thank you so very much for stopping by and reading the article 🙂 Comments like this make us want to stretch ourselves more and write in depth reviews.

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